11 of Lagertha’s epic hairstyles

11 of Lagertha’s epic hairstyles

11 of Lagertha’s epic hairstyles

On the 11th day of Viking, we give you 11 of Lagertha’s most standout hairstyles. Celebrate the 12 Days of Vikings with us, and come back every other day to see what Vikings moment or character we’ll be celebrating next!

11. Braided Updo

Lagertha 01

This hairstyle really accentuates Lagertha’s gorgeous facial features, with the tight braids on the side and the majority of her length braided at the crown of her head.

10. Battle Braids

Lagertha walking

Lagertha usually sports similar styles to this when she’s going to be in combat, and it definitely amps up the intimidation factor. With braids and twists all along the crown of her head, it creates a fearsome style suitable for only the best shield maidens.

9. Regal and Powerful 

Lagertha riding a horse

In her first appearance to Ragnar as Earl, Lagertha is exuding power, and this hairstyle totally helps. The braiding at the top creates a faux-hawk effect, giving her the look of a rebellious leader.

8. Volume, Volume, Volume

LagerthaHair09

Lagertha loves complex detailing, and this is a perfect example of that. The small braids on her crown add so much volume to the style, allowing her wavy locks to add a soft feminine quality. The look really balances out because it’s equal parts rugged and beautiful.

7. Farming Braids

LagerthaHair10

When travelling to the new land they’ve been given for farming, Lagertha opts for a twist on her classic half-braided locks. The top of her hair is coiffed instead of braided, and adds a certain sophistication to the look. The side braids are still present, and seem to be her go-to staple.

6. Fury Braids

LagerthaHair11

If there’s one thing that Lagertha is good at, it’s having hair as fierce as she is. The mess of braids really draws her hair back from her face, allowing her emotions to show through fully. The hair forms almost a crown on her head, giving her a look of power.

5. Epic Shield Maiden 

LagerthaHair12

The braids within this look allow Lagertha to focus on the battle without distraction. They also lend help in making her look imposing and fearsome. Her hair just gets more and more complex as the episodes go on, it’s amazing how she finds the time to do it.

4. Complex Detailing

Lagertha on a boat

Just look at the right side of her hair, the detailing is absolutely incredible. Lagertha’s hair in this scene reveals just how far she’s come from being simply the daughter of farmers. Her hair reflects how complex her life has become, and it’s beautiful.

3. Side BraidLagerthaHair14

Even when Lagertha has just suffered a death (at her own hands, but still), she finds the time to have a complex braid adorning her beautifully long hair. It adds just enough to her appearance without being overwhelming.

2. Simple Elegance

LagerthaHair01

It’s not often that Lagertha only sports side braids, but this is one of those rare moments. She looks very feminine and elegant, while still maintaining her signature style.

  1. Dignified Plait

Braid Lagertha

Lagertha is her own woman now, and she has a beautiful new hairstyle to reflect that. The detailing on the braid is so cool, and really different from anything we’ve seen from her before. It leads us to believe that new style isn’t the only thing she has in store for us.

Lagertha definitely has a lot of unique styles, and we love them all. Make sure to tune into Vikings Wednesdays at 9 EST to see more of her iconic hair looks.

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December 12, 1901 – First Atlantic wireless

December 12, 1901 – First Atlantic wireless

December 12, 1901 – First Atlantic wireless

Italian physicist and radio pioneer Guglielmo Marconi succeeds in sending the first radio transmission across the Atlantic Ocean, disproving detractors who told him that the curvature of the earth would limit transmission to 200 miles or less. In Newfoundland, Canada, Marconi received the message–simply the Morse-code signal for the letter s –after it traveled over 2,000 miles from Cornwall, England. Marconi’s earlier wireless efforts went largely unappreciated. After his transatlantic transmission, his discoveries received world attention. In 1909, he received the Nobel Prize in physics.

December 10, 1941 – Japan becomes master of the Pacific and South China Sea

December 10, 1941 – Japan becomes master of the Pacific and South China Sea

December 10, 1941 – Japan becomes master of the Pacific and South China Sea

On this day, 4,000 Japanese troops land on the Philippine Islands, while Japanese aircraft sink the British warships Prince of Wales and Repulse. Guam, an American-controlled territory, was also seized. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill finally exclaims, “We have lost control of the sea.” The attack on Pearl Harbor was only one step in a larger plan to dominate the Pacific, which entailed knocking out first American, then British, naval opposition. Japanese bombing raids on Guam, Midway Island, and Wake Island followed the attack on the American fleet anchored at Pearl Harbor. American airfields there were destroyed, as were Clark and Iba airfields in the Philippines, wiping out more than half of the United States’ aircraft dedicated to the Far East. These bombing raids were followed up, on December 10, by 2,000 Japanese troops that landed on the Philippine island of Luzon in the north, and another 2,000 that landed at Vigan on the western coast. And in Guam, 700 Japanese Special Naval Landing Forces invaded and occupied the American-controlled military outpost of Guam after only a 25-minute military engagement, resulting in the capture of 500 Americans soldiers. The United States was not alone in its struggle for the Pacific. Great Britain had also declared war on the Empire of Japan on December 8. The next day, Japan occupied the capital of Thailand and then landed in the Malay Peninsula, which could not be repulsed by the outmatched Australian and Indian troops. Britain responded by dispatching Force Z, their Royal Navy unit dedicated to supporting Singapore, when Japanese bombers spotted Z’s battleship, the Prince of Wales, and its sister ship, the Repulse, sailing for Kuantan on the eastern coast of the Malay Peninsula, on the erroneous belief that the Japanese had just put troops ashore there. The bombers rained down torpedo bombs on the British warships, sinking them and killing 840 men. “In all the war, I have never received a more direct shock,” Churchill lamented. And the Japanese were far from finished: The humiliation of the United States in the Philippines and a more extensive occupation of Indochina and the South Pacific were still to come.

December 13, 1942 – Goebbels complains of Italians’ treatment of Jews

December 13, 1942 – Goebbels complains of Italians’ treatment of Jews

December 13, 1942 – Goebbels complains of Italians’ treatment of Jews

On this day, Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels records in his journal his contempt for the Italians’ treatment of Jews in Italian-occupied territories. “The Italians are extremely lax in their treatment of Jews. They protect Italian Jews both in Tunis and in occupied France and won’t permit their being drafted for work or compelled to wear the Star of David.” Joseph Goebbels had made the persecution, and ultimately the extermination, of Jews a personal priority from the earliest days of the war, often recording in his diary such statements as: “They are no longer people but beasts.” “Their destruction will go hand in hand with the destruction of our enemies.” “[T]he Jews … are now being evacuated eastward. The procedure is pretty barbaric and is not to be described here more definitely. Not much will remain of the Jews.” It was on his recommendation that all Jews in occupied Paris be forced to wear a yellow star on the left side of their coats or jackets in order to identify and humiliate them. His vituperative anti-Semitism, which included blaming the war itself on the Jews in a screed published in the German magazine Das Reich, could not be contained within the boundaries of Germany. He expected the same of his allies. But, truth be told, in the earliest days of fascism, Mussolini had denied any truth to the idea of a “pure” race and had counted Jews among his close colleagues-and was even a Zionist! But with Italy’s failing fortunes militarily, Mussolini needed to stress the Italians’ “superiority” in some sense, and so began to mimic many of the racial and anti-Jewish legislation of the Nazis. Nevertheless, Mussolini never had the stomach-or the conviction-for the extremes of Goebbels, Goering, and Hitler. And certainly the majority of the Italian people never subscribed to the growing anti-Semitic rhetoric of the regime. In fact, the Italians refused to deport Jews from Italy-or from Italian-occupied Croatia or France-to Auschwitz. The majority of Italians’ courage to reject the worst of fascist ideology–its anti-Semitism–remains one bright spot in Italy’s otherwise appalling World War II record.

December 10, 1993 – Mike Myers stars in Wayne’s World 2

December 10, 1993 – Mike Myers stars in Wayne’s World 2

December 10, 1993 – Mike Myers stars in Wayne’s World 2

On this day in 1993, Wayne’s World 2–the sequel to the 1992 hit comedy starring Mike Myers and Dana Carvey as a pair of long-haired, heavy-metal-loving slackers who produce a cable access TV show from their basement–opens in theaters. Co-written by Myers, Wayne’s World was based on a popular sketch from TV’s Saturday Night Live featuring the Aurora, Illinois-based high school friends Wayne Campbell (Myers) and Garth Algar (Carvey), who host a show in which they play air guitar and hold forth on such topics as women and the god-like status of their musical idols, Aerosmith. Wayne and Garth popularized a long list of catchphrases, including: “Party on,” “We’re not worthy” and “Excellent!” Skits from Saturday Night Live, which debuted on NBC in 1975, have inspired a string of films, including The Blues Brothers (1980), Coneheads (1993) and A Night at the Roxbury (1998). Wayne’s World is the highest grossing of these movies to date, while Wayne’s World 2 comes in third, behind The Blues Brothers. Wayne Campbell was just one of many memorable characters played by Mike Myers during his years as a cast member on Saturday Night Live. He donned a female wig and dressed in drag to portray the middle-aged New Yorker Linda Richman of “Coffee Talk,” whose catchphrases include “Like buttah,” “Talk amongst yourselves” and “I’m a little verklempt.” Clad in head-to-toe black, Myers was Dieter, the bored host of the fictional German TV talk show Sprockets, who was known for saying “Your story has become tiresome” and “Touch my monkey.” Born on May 25, 1963, in Scarborough, Ontario, Canada, Myers began acting on Canadian television as a child, appearing in commercials and TV shows. He joined the cast of Saturday Night Live in 1989 and remained with the show through 1995. Following the success of the first Wayne’s World movie, which premiered on February 14, 1992, Meyers had a mega-hit with 1997’s Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, a James Bond satire in which he plays a womanizing British spy with bad teeth, a personal style stuck in the 1960s and the catchphrase “Yeah, baby, yeah.” The sequel, 1999’s Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, proved an even bigger box-office hit; it was followed by 2002’s Austin Powers in Goldmember. In 2001, the Canadian funnyman scored yet another huge hit with the animated feature Shrek, in which he voiced, in a Scottish accent, the lovable green ogre of the movie’s title. Also featuring the vocal talents of Eddie Murphy and Cameron Diaz, the film spawned the successful sequels Shrek 2 (2004) and Shrek the Third (2007). Not all of Myers’ movies have been box-office gold, however: In 2008, he starred in The Love Guru, a film that was panned by most reviewers and failed to attract the massive audiences of Myers’ previous efforts.

December 13, 1642 – Tasman discovers New Zealand

December 13, 1642 – Tasman discovers New Zealand

December 13, 1642 – Tasman discovers New Zealand

Dutch navigator Abel Tasman becomes the first European explorer to sight the South Pacific island group now known as New Zealand. In his sole attempt to land, several of Tasman’s crew were killed by warriors from a South Island tribe, who interpreted the Europeans’ exchange of trumpet signals as a prelude to battle. A few weeks earlier, Tasman had discovered Tasmania, off the southeast coast of Australia. Tasman had named the island Van Diemen’s Land, but, like the Tasman Sea between New Zealand and Australia, it was later renamed Tasmania in the explorer’s honor. New Zealand, named after the Dutch province of Zeeland, did not attract much additional European attention until the late 18th century, when English explorer Captain James Cook traveled through the area and wrote detailed accounts of the islands. Whalers, missionaries, and traders followed, and in 1840 Britain formally annexed the islands and established New Zealand’s first permanent European settlement at Wellington.

December 10, 1901 – First Nobel Prizes

December 10, 1901 – First Nobel Prizes

December 10, 1901 – First Nobel Prizes

The first Nobel Prizes are awarded in Stockholm, Sweden, in the fields of physics, chemistry, medicine, literature, and peace. Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, who regretted the damage done by his invention of dynamite, created the awards. When he died in 1896, he directed the creation of a fund, the interest of which was to be distributed annually to those who have conferred the greatest benefit on mankind. Five years after his death, the first five Nobel Prizes were awarded. Today, the award is regarded as the most prestigious in the world. Notable winners have included Marie Curie, Theodore Roosevelt, Albert Einstein, George Bernard Shaw, Winston Churchill, Mother Teresa, the Dalai Lama, Martin Luther King Jr., Mikhail Gorbachev, and Nelson Mandela.

December 13, 1937 – The Rape of Nanking

December 13, 1937 – The Rape of Nanking

December 13, 1937 – The Rape of Nanking

During the Sino-Japanese War, Nanking, the capital of China, falls to Japanese forces and the Chinese government flees to Hankow, further inland along the Yangtze River. To break the spirit of Chinese resistance, Japanese General Matsui Iwane ordered that the city of Nanking be destroyed. Much of the city was burned, and Japanese troops launched a campaign of atrocities against civilians. In what became known as the Rape of Nanking, the Japanese butchered an estimated 150,000 male war prisoners, massacred an additional 50,000 male civilians, and raped at least 20,000 women and girls of all ages, many of whom were mutilated or killed in the process. Shortly after the end of World War II, Matsui was found guilty of war crimes by the International Military Tribunal for the Far East and executed.

December 11, 1994 – Yeltsin orders Russian forces into Chechnya

December 11, 1994 – Yeltsin orders Russian forces into Chechnya

December 11, 1994 – Yeltsin orders Russian forces into Chechnya

In the largest Russian military offensive since the 1979 invasion of Afghanistan, thousands of troops and hundreds of tanks pour into the breakaway Russian republic of Chechnya. Encountering only light resistance, Russian forces had by evening pushed to the outskirts of the Chechen capital of Grozny, where several thousand Chechen volunteers vowed a bitter fight against the Russians. With the collapse of the USSR in 1991, Chechnya, like many of the other republics encompassed by the former Soviet Union, declared its independence. However, unlike Georgia, the Ukraine, Uzbekistan, and the other former Soviet states, Chechnya held only the barest autonomy under Soviet rule and was not considered one of the 15 official Soviet republics. Instead, Chechnya is regarded as one of many republics within the Russian Federation. Russian President Boris Yeltsin, who permitted the dissolution of the Soviet Union, would not tolerate the secession of a state within territorial Russia. About the size of Connecticut and located in southeastern Russia on the Caspian Sea, Chechnya was conquered by the Russians in the 1850s as the Russian empire pushed south toward the Middle East. Its people are largely Muslim and fiercely independent, and the region has been a constant irritant to its Russian and Soviet rulers. In August 1991, Dzhozkhar Dudayev, a Chechen politician and former Soviet air force general, toppled Chechnya’s local communist government and established an anti-Russian autocratic state. President Yeltsin feared the secession of Chechnya would prompt a domino effect of independence movements within the vast Russian Federation. He also hoped to recover Chechnya’s valuable oil resources. After ineffective attempts at funding Chechen opposition groups, a Russian invasion began on December 11, 1994. After the initial gains of the Russian army, the Chechen rebels demonstrated a fierce resistance in Grozny, and thousands of Russian troops died and many more Chechen civilians were killed during almost two years of heavy fighting. In August 1996, Grozny was retaken by the Chechen rebels after a year of Russian occupation, and a cease-fire was declared. In 1997, the last humiliated Russian troops left Chechnya. Despite a peace agreement that left Chechnya a de facto independent state, Chechnya remained officially part of Russia. In 1999, Yeltsin’s government ordered a second invasion of Chechnya after bombings in Moscow and other cities were linked to Chechen militants. Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, Yeltsin’s handpicked successor as Russian leader, said of the Chechen terrorists, “we will rub them out, even in the toilet.” In 2000, President Putin escalated Russian military involvement in Chechnya after terrorist bombings in Russian cities continued. In this second round of post-Soviet fighting in Chechnya, the Russian army has been accused of many atrocities in its efforts to suppress Chechen militancy. A peace agreement remains elusive.

9 shocking Vikings moments

9 shocking Vikings moments

9 shocking Vikings moments

On the 9th day of Vikings, we give you 9 of the most shocking moments. Celebrate the 12 Days of Vikings with us, and come back every other day to see what Vikings moment or character we’ll be celebrating next!

9. Rollo’s marriage to Gisla

Gisla and Rollo talking

This was one thing that nobody saw coming. Rollo becoming a royal, and marrying a princess? Having been a warrior and true viking from the beginning, this was one surprise that really threw us through a loop. He does kind of suit it though, doesn’t he?

8. Ivar’s birth

Aslaug warned Ragnar of a cursed child should he not listen to her warnings, and he did just that. The true shock was the extent of Ivar’s disability, and the thought of what a struggle it would be in the time of the vikings.

7. Aslaug’s arrival

Ragnar, Lagertha, and Aslaug

Ragnar and Lagertha’s faces in this scene say it all. Nobody was expecting Aslaug to show up on their doorstep, and pregnant with Ragnar’s child no less. This scene was a catalyst for a lot of change in the lives of our lead characters, and made for the story we know now.

6. Lagertha leaves Ragnar

Ragnar riding fast

Not only a shocking moment, but a sad one. It was hard to believe that Lagertha would truly not spend the rest of her life as Ragnar’s wife. Seeing Ragnar race after her was a spectacle in itself, and the interaction once he caught her was heartbreaking as it tore our two leading characters apart.

5. Lagertha kills her fiance 

Lagertha walking

Lagertha always delivers on her promises, and we learned that in this scene. I don’t know how many people were really expecting her to kill Kalf, but she did, and it taught everyone never to underestimate her. Husbands don’t stand a chance.

4. Siggy’s death

siggy

To save Aslaug’s children, Siggy had to dive into the ice and put herself at risk. Ultimately, she ended up giving up her life to save them. It was quite a shock after seeing so much promise in her role within the village.

3. Lagertha becoming Earl

Lagertha 01

While Lagertha has always exuded power and grace, becoming Earl was a surprise in itself. No one knew she had a plot to kill her husband except for one accomplice, and it made for an excellent plan. The snap movement that caused his death and her rise in power was a shock for all that were watching.

2. Athelstan’s death

Floki took shock to a new level when he murdered Athelstan, and Ragnar was forced to face the loss of one of his very best friends. It was the beginning of a very different era for Ragnar, and the loss of Athelstan’s guidance was the cause of an immense amount of change.

  1. Ragnar’s disappearance/reappearance 

Ragnar looking around

The time jump of Ragnar’s disappearance was quite the surprise. Finding out that he had just left his family and friends behind for years was utterly shocking. The people of his kingdom were equally as shocked when he showed up out of the blue, challenging his sons to kill him.

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